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Lithium Batteries

Lithium batteries may be dangerous and can cause fire if not carried properly. Whether a lithium battery can be carried by air or not depends on its configuration and its Watt-hour (Wh) rating (for rechargeable lithium-ion/polymer batteries) or Lithium Content (LC) (for non-rechargeable lithium metal batteries).

Please use the following table to determine if the battery you intend to bring is acceptable:

Watt-hour
Rating (Wh) or
(Li Content)

Examples

Configuration

Carry-on Baggage

Check-in Baggage

≤ 100 Wh
(2 g)

(See Note 8)

Small lithium batteries and cells for mobile phones, cameras, watches, portable music players, most original laptop computers, etc

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In equipment

Yes

Yes (but recommended to put in carry-on baggage) (See Note 4)

Spares

Yes
20 pieces per passenger

No

> 100 to ≤ 160 Wh

Medium lithium batteries and cells include extended life batteries for laptop computers, and batteries used by audiovisual professionals

Click to enlarge image

In equipment

Yes

Yes (but recommended to put in carry-on baggage) (See Note 4)

Spares

Yes
2 pieces per passenger

No

> 160 Wh

Large lithium batteries and cells primarily for equipment used in industry, and may be found in some electric and hybrid vehicles, mobility devices, scooters, etc

Click to enlarge image

Forbidden in any baggage
Must be presented and carried as Cargo in accordance with the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

For lithium-ion battery powered wheelchairs or other similar mobility aids for use by passengers whose mobility is restricted by a disability, health/age, or a temporary mobility problem (eg broken leg), please contact our reservations office for assistance.

Important Notes on Lithium Battery:

  1. Please ensure that you have the information available for our staff when requested on the Watt-hour (Wh) or Lithium content (g) for all the installed and spare batteries that you are planning to bring either as carry-on or check-in baggage.
    • Amp-hours (Ah) to Watt-hours (Wh) Conversion: Multiply Ah by Voltage (V), (1Ah = 1,000 mAh), both of these data are displayed on the information plate of the battery.
    • Example: 2.38Ah x 14.4V = 34 Wh for a laptop computer lithium-ion battery
  2. Lithium batteries must be of a type which meets the United Nations (UN) test requirements specified in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III Section 38.3.
  3. Equipment/Electronic devices installed with built-in or plug-in lithium batteries such as laptop computers, cameras, mobile phones etc must be switched off with measures to be taken to ensure that they cannot be accidentally activated when placed in check-in baggage.
  4. The maximum number of equipment/electronic devices containing lithium batteries (each within 160Wh or 2g) for carriage in check-in baggage is 10 pieces per passenger, and up to 10 pieces in each bag. For example:
    • 10 pieces per passenger in total (e.g. one passenger checks in two bags)
    • 10 pieces maximum in one bag (e.g. two passengers check in one bag only)
  5. Spare batteries, also called “loose” batteries, are those not installed in equipment. A lithium-ion battery inside your laptop computer is an installed battery. A battery carried separately, as a backup when installed battery runs low, is a spare battery.
  6. Terminals of all spare lithium batteries placed in carry-on baggage must be protected from short circuit by:
    • Enclosing them in their original retail packaging, or
    • Taping over the terminals, or
    • Placing each battery in a separate plastic bag (or protective pouch)
  7. Portable battery charger (with built-in lithium batteries) used to recharge the lithium-ion batteries contained in equipment, such as mobile phone, is considered as spare lithium battery.
  8. Non-rechargeable batteries with more than 2 grams of lithium (eg ‘C’ size battery and above) are forbidden in any baggage and must be presented and carried as Cargo in accordance with the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations.
  9. For US DOT regulations, passengers travelling to and from the US with lithium batteries should visit http://safetravel.dot.gov/quick_chart.html for details.
  10. Lithium batteries carried in any baggage must conform to the above acceptance criteria. For safety concern, we may refuse further carriage of any excessive and unacceptable batteries upon discovery.
  11. You may be requested by our staff to declare your conformance of the above lithium batteries regulations. It is a criminal offence to make a false statement in response to this question. The offence is punishable on conviction to a fine of HK$ 10,000 and /or imprisonment for up to 6 months and we will inform the Police and airport security services.  Please note that your bags may be searched before and / or after check-in.

Spare lithium batteries must not be placed in check-in baggage.

Other Batteries

Commercially available types of batteries such as Ni-Cad (nickel cadmium) and alkaline can be carried safely in either check-in or carry-on baggage provided they are adequately protected against short circuit.

The terminals of all spare batteries must be protected from short circuit by:

  • Enclosing them in their original retail packaging or
  • Taping over the terminals
  • Placing each battery in a separate plastic bag (or protective pouch)

Batteries contained in equipment such as laptop computers, cameras, mobile phones etc must be switched off and measures taken to ensure that they cannot be accidentally activated when placed in checked baggage.

Refer to Medical Devices for more information on Portable Medical Electronic Device.